Earworm Farm

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wnycradiolab:

thekidshouldseethis:

Water Balloons Falling (and Bouncing) in Slow Motion.
Rewatch the video.

Well. That’s awesome.

wnycradiolab:

thekidshouldseethis:

Water Balloons Falling (and Bouncing) in Slow Motion.

Rewatch the video.

Well. That’s awesome.

Quality is better than quantity. One home run is better than two doubles.

- Steve Jobs, who was a nerd who did not understand baseball, a sport in which two doubles is almost invariably better than a home run. (via jessethorn)

My brother, Richard, nominated me for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. I wanted to do something a little different, so I made an audio recording of the experience.

I now challenge my fellow Everything Sounds host and producer George Drake Jr.

I’ve also decided to make matching contributions to The ALS Association and Charity Water. We’re fortunate to have easy access to clean, safe water to use for the challenge, but not everyone does. Consider supporting Charity Water and their excellent work as well!

http://alsa.org

http://charitywater.org/

ninjasexfarty:

Back when I was in charge of hiring for GameStop, a guy came in, handed me his application, and ‘accidentally’ let a sonic screwdriver fall out of his sleeve. “Now that you know I’m a time lord, I guess you’ll haaaaave to interview me,” he laughed alone, and that’s why I refuse to watch Doctor Who.

99percentinvisible:

What Apple learned from Picasso

Discrimination is alive and well in 2014. #yesalllobsters

Discrimination is alive and well in 2014. #yesalllobsters

putthison:

Fake Deals
Medium has a story today on the less-than-honest business practices of discount and outlet stores. An excerpt: 

Despite common belief, outlet clothing never enters a “regular” store and is most likely produced in an entirely different factory than the “regular” clothing. A few months ago I met with some people from Banana Republic Outlet. Banana Republic has a team of people whose sole responsibility is to design and manage production for their outlet stores. Their production team was looking for new ways to diversify their outlet product-line in order to compete with H&M and Zara. It is rumored that these huge retailers have such agile supply-chains that they are able to bring new product to their stores every 2 weeks. While Banana Republic and J.Crew are not trying to compete on price with H&M, their outlet counterparts must. This means that these companies produce lower cost and lower quality clothing specifically for their outlet stores.
[…]
TJ Maxx, known for it’s off-price designer labels, finds itself in a similar position. Ever notice that TJ’s will have a surplus of Calvin Klein, or Rachel Roy, or Elie Tahari clothing? This happens when TJ Maxx brokers a licensing deal with one of these brands. In this situation, the brand (ex: Calvin Klein) agrees to let TJ Maxx produce clothing with their label on it in return for a percentage, usually between 5-20% of the wholesale price of the garment. To put this in perspective, in 2012 Calvin Klein reported that “licensed products currently represent slightly over 50% of global retail sales.” At that time, licensing alone accounted for more than $3.8 billion in CK sales.
Licensing can be a great situation for the brand because they do not have to manage sourcing, production, or shipping. TJ Maxx, or the licensee, manages all of the nitty-gritty stuff, and makes the product in their factories at prices that they control. Then, they put the reputable brand label on the clothing and write that company a check. These branded garments end up at discount retailers and consumers buy them thinking that they’ve just scored an awesome Calvin Klein blazer.

You can read the rest of the article here. To figure out which outlet stores are worth visiting, you can read Jesse’s post from four years ago (as far as I know, all those recommendations are still good). He also has a great post on diffusion lines and licensed clothing. 

putthison:

Fake Deals

Medium has a story today on the less-than-honest business practices of discount and outlet stores. An excerpt: 

Despite common belief, outlet clothing never enters a “regular” store and is most likely produced in an entirely different factory than the “regular” clothing. A few months ago I met with some people from Banana Republic Outlet. Banana Republic has a team of people whose sole responsibility is to design and manage production for their outlet stores. Their production team was looking for new ways to diversify their outlet product-line in order to compete with H&M and Zara. It is rumored that these huge retailers have such agile supply-chains that they are able to bring new product to their stores every 2 weeks. While Banana Republic and J.Crew are not trying to compete on price with H&M, their outlet counterparts must. This means that these companies produce lower cost and lower quality clothing specifically for their outlet stores.

[…]

TJ Maxx, known for it’s off-price designer labels, finds itself in a similar position. Ever notice that TJ’s will have a surplus of Calvin Klein, or Rachel Roy, or Elie Tahari clothing? This happens when TJ Maxx brokers a licensing deal with one of these brands. In this situation, the brand (ex: Calvin Klein) agrees to let TJ Maxx produce clothing with their label on it in return for a percentage, usually between 5-20% of the wholesale price of the garment. To put this in perspective, in 2012 Calvin Klein reported that “licensed products currently represent slightly over 50% of global retail sales.” At that time, licensing alone accounted for more than $3.8 billion in CK sales.

Licensing can be a great situation for the brand because they do not have to manage sourcing, production, or shipping. TJ Maxx, or the licensee, manages all of the nitty-gritty stuff, and makes the product in their factories at prices that they control. Then, they put the reputable brand label on the clothing and write that company a check. These branded garments end up at discount retailers and consumers buy them thinking that they’ve just scored an awesome Calvin Klein blazer.

You can read the rest of the article here. To figure out which outlet stores are worth visiting, you can read Jesse’s post from four years ago (as far as I know, all those recommendations are still good). He also has a great post on diffusion lines and licensed clothing

backstoryradio:

On August 21, 1959, President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Hawaii Admission Act, making Hawaii the 50th state in the Union. The new state added a 50th star to the national flag — thus ending the brief reign of the 49-star flag that began when Alaska became the 49th state in January of that year.

nevver:

“…when you’re looking at live footage of a city in your country where people are being ASSAULTED by the police - side with the people.

putthison:

John Oliver on police militarization and Ferguson, Missouri.

putthison:

John Oliver on police militarization and Ferguson, Missouri.